Pvt Ambrose C Ames
Ambrose C Ames name: Ames, Ambrose C
aka:   
Rank: Pvt 
Branch: Union 
Regiment: Co. F & S, 12th Independent Battery, Wisconsin Light Artillery
Cemetery: Oakhill G.A.R. Cemetery, Janesville, Rock, Wisconsin 
Sec-plot: 99-15-6 
Service: 6/1/1861 - 2/5/1864
Birth: abt 1828 New York
Death: 2/5/1864 Huntsville, Alabama
Notes: Died of disease. This is a memorial stone. Pvt Ames is buried in section L site 9456 at the Chattanooga National Cemetery, Chattanooga Tennesee. Cemetery records show he was buried the same day he died.

Ambrose first enlisted in the Regimental Band, 22nd Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. He transfered to the 12th Battery, Light Artillery, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry on Aug. 20, 1862 
 
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Chattanooga National Cemetery, 1200 Bailey Avenue, Chattanooga, TN


On Dec. 25, 1863, Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas, ''The Rock of Chickamauga,'' issued General Orders No. 296 creating a national cemetery in commemoration of the Battles of Chattanooga, Nov. 23-27, 1863. Gen. Thomas selected the cemetery site during the assault of his troops that carried Missionary Ridge and brought the campaign to an end. The land was originally appropriated, but later purchased, from local residents Joseph Ruohs, Robert M. Hooke and J. R. Slayton.

The site Thomas selected was approximately 75 acres of a round hill rising with a uniform slope to a height of 100 feet; it faced Missionary Ridge on one side and Lookout Mountain on the other. Gen. Grant established his headquarters on the summit of the hill during the early phase of the four-day battle for Lookout Mountain.

Chaplain Thomas B. Van Horne was placed in charge of the cemetery’s development. In a report of May 14, 1866, the chaplain indicated that one-third of the cemetery site could not be used for burials due to large rock outcroppings. As a result, he suggested a design dictated by the rocky terrain. Much was accomplished during Van Horne’s tenure at the cemetery. Flowering shrubs, evergreens and other trees were planted to replace a portion of the dense forest of oak trees that had been cut down as a part of the battleground. Each interment section consisted of a central site for a monument surrounded by plots for officers with the graves of enlisted personnel arranged in concentric circles around them. In 1867, it was designated Chattanooga National Cemetery.

By 1870, more than 12,800 interments were complete: 8,685 known and 4,189 unknown. The dead included men who fell at the battles of Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and Lookout Mountain. There were also a number of reinterments from the surrounding area, including Athens, Charleston and locations along the line of Gen. Sherman’s march to Atlanta. A large number of men—1,798 remains—who died at the Battle of Chickamauga were relegated to unknowns during the reinterment process.

In addition to Civil War veterans, there are 78 German prisoners of war buried here. Pursuant to provisions included in the peace treaty between the United States and Germany at the end of World War I, the German government sought the location and status of the gravesites of Germans who died while detained in the United States. An investigation conducted by the War Department found that the largest number of German POWs was interred at Chattanooga National Cemetery. For a short time, thought was given to removing all other German interments to Chattanooga. In the end, however, the German government decided that only 23 remains from Hot Springs National Cemetery should be reinterred here. The German government assumed the cost of disinterment and transportation to Chattanooga, and erected a monument to commemorate the POWs.

Chattanooga National Cemetery was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1996.

Source: Dept. of Veterans Affairs


  12th Independent Battery, Wisconsin Light Artillery1

Organized at St. Louis, Mo., under authority of Governor Harvey, as a Company for the 1st Missouri Light Artillery, to be known as the 12th Wisconsin Battery February and March, 1862. Moved to Hamburg Landing, Tenn., May 6, 1862. Attached to Artillery Division, Army of Mississippi, to September, 1862. Artillery, 3rd Division, Army of Mississippi, to November, 1862. Artillery, 7th Division, Left Wing, 13th Army Corps (Old), Dept. of the Tennessee, to December, 1862. Artillery, 7th Division, 16th Army Corps, to January, 1863. Artillery, 7th Division, 17th Army Corps, to September, 1863. Artillery, 2nd Division, 17th Army Corps, to December, 1863. Artillery, 3rd Division, 15th Army Corps, to September, 1864. Artillery Brigade, 15th Army Corps, to June, 1865.

SERVICE.-Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., May 8-30, 1862. Pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 6. At Camp Clear Creek till August. Ordered to Jacinto August 14. Battle of Iuka , Miss., September 19. Battle of Corinth, Miss., October 3-4. Pursuit to Ripley October 5-12. At Corinth till November 8. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign. Operations on the Mississippi Central Railroad November, 1862, to January, 1863. Duty at Germantown, Tenn., January 4 to February 8, 1863. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., February 8; thence to Grand Lake, Ark. Yazoo Pass Expedition and operations against Fort Pemberton and Greenwood March 13-April 5. Moved to Milliken's Bend, La., April 16. Movement on Bruinsburg and turning Grand Gulf April 25-30. Battle of Port Gibson , Miss., May 1 (Reserve). Battles of Raymond May 12. Jackson May 14. Champion's Hill May 16. Siege of Vicksburg , Miss., May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Surrender of Vicksburg July 4. Duty at Vicksburg till September. Moved to Helena, Ark., September 12; thence to Memphis, Tenn., September 27. March to Chattanooga, Tenn., October 6-November 20. Operations on Memphis & Charleston Railroad in Alabama October 20-29. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Tunnel Hill November 24-25. Mission Ridge November 25. Duty at Bridgeport, Ala., till December 22; at Larkinsville till January 7, 1864, and at Huntsville, Ala., till June 22. March to Kingston, Ga., June 22-30, and duty there till July 13. Moved to Allatoona, Ga., July 13, and duty there till November 12. Repulse of French's attack on Allatoona October 6. Reconnoissance from Rome on Cave Springs Road and skirmishes October 12-13. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Siege of Savannah December 10-21. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Combahee River, S. C., January 28. Hickory Hill February 1. South Edisto River February 9. North Edisto River February 12-13. Congaree Creek February 15. Columbia February 16-17. Battle of Bentonville, N. C., March 19-21. Near Falling Creek March 20. Mill Creek March 22. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D. C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 20. Grand Review May 24. Mustered out June 26, 1865.

Battery lost during service 1 Officer and 10 Enlisted men killed and mortaily wounded and 23 Enlisted men by disease. Total 34.

1 Source: National Park Service, Soldiers and Sailors System; "A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion" by Frederick H. Dyer,Cosmas; An Army for Empire : The United States Army in the Spanish American War by A. Graham, (Shippensburg, PA: White Mane Publishing Co., 1993).

 
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